Business Analyst = Product Owner, My Two Cents

A few days a go, a fellow BA, Anthony Arriagada, made the statement on LinkedIn that BAs are essentially product owners. The ensuing discussion was insightful.

Here’s my two cents- a BA can be a PO, but not every PO is a BA.

Here’s why.

To evaluate this statement carefully, I think we need to take a step back. We call ourselves Business Analysts (BA) primarily because we practice the art of business analysis. For the most part, we accept that the IIBA sets the parameters around the art we practice, including methodologies and techniques. Business Analysts can serve in various industries and be given various titles, but it is what we do, and how we do it, that allows us to collectively call ourselves Business Analysts.

The same can be said of a ‘product owner’. This title has been defined by a specific methodology, and has it’s own set …

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Believing without evidence is always morally wrong

Strangely enough, shortly after I published the immediately preceding blog post, I found this article posted on Reddit. The title above belongs to the below article.


You have probably never heard of William Kingdon Clifford. He is not in the pantheon of great philosophers – perhaps because his life was cut short at the age of 33 – but I cannot think of anyone whose ideas are more relevant for our interconnected, AI-driven, digital age. This might seem strange given that we are talking about a Victorian Briton whose most famous philosophical work is an essay nearly 150 years ago. However, reality has caught up with Clifford. His once seemingly exaggerated claim that ‘it is wrong always, everywhere, and for anyone, to believe anything upon insufficient evidence’ is no longer hyperbole but a technical reality.

In ‘The Ethics of Belief’ (1877), Clifford gives three arguments as to why …

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